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Shop by Age

0 - 3 Months

At 0 - 3 months baby wants toys that will focus on strengthening their muscles and toys that give them visual stimulation.



3 -6 Months

This age is an exciting time for baby hands because their hands no longer clasp giving them the ability to grab. Other development areas include practising motor skills and learning that objects are still there even if they cannot see them. 



6 - 9 Months

 Baby will be more active and is getting stronger at this stage as baby starts moving around. The best toys at this age will encourage baby to  work on eye-hand coordination. Allow baby to explore how to stack items and then knock them over! and provide opportunities for him to learn cause and effect.



9 - 12 Months

At 9 – 12 months skills include learning cause and effect, practising upper body balance and excellent finger motor skills.



1 - 2 Years

Your baby is fascinated by cause and effect and will enjoy any toy that responds to his actions and makes use of newly acquired motor skills. They will enjoy stories, say their first words, and can play next to other children (but not yet with!).



2 - 3 Years

Your child's play is now more purposeful, and she has the fine motor skills needed to complete a puzzle or build with blocks by herself. She'll start to enjoy pretend play that imitates the actions of people around her. She'll like high-tech toys that make real-life sounds, such as telephones that ring or dolls that talk. Boys and girls are both very active at this age and will still enjoy their push- and pull-toys. 



3 Years +

Your child is now more interested in playing and making friends with other children. She might start to play more cooperatively in small groups. She understands the concept of ‘mine’ and ‘his/hers’, so sharing starts to get easier. Your child is becoming more imaginative during play. For example, he might play pretend games with imaginary friends or toys, like having a tea party with his toys. He’ll try different roles and behaviour – for example, he might pretend to be a doctor or a parent.